grapes-pinot-noir
EDUCATION

Sangiovese

(san-joh-VAY-zeh)

Sangiovese is the most famous grape found throughout central Italy, primarily throughout Tuscany where the historic Chianti region is located. This grape varietal goes by various names, depending on the type of clone, such as Sangioveto in Chianti, Brunello in Montalcino, and Prugnolo in Montepulciano. Sangiovese is often a stand-alone varietal, as in Brunello di Montalcino, but is more often blended with small amounts of indigenous Italian grapes in the wines of Chianti and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. It has also been blended with greater amounts of international varietals such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot to create the Super Tuscan wines of Tuscany.

  • Aroma/Flavor Components:

Sangiovese offers fairly aromatic elements of fruits (cherry and black cherry), bakeshop (spice and nuts), earth (dirt and peat moss), tobacco shop (cigar, tea leaves, and leather), and floral (violet and rose).

  • Structural Components:

Sangiovese-based wines can range from medium- to full-bodied, with medium-to-high acid and tannin. Lighter versions may be labeled simply as Chianti or Rosso di Montalcino; medium versions may be labeled Chianti Classico; and full-bodied versions Chianti Classico Riserva, Chianti Classico Selezione, Brunello di Montalcino, and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano.

  • Significant Locations:

Italy (Tuscany), and more specifically the area of and surrounding Chianti (kee-AHN-tee).